Nutritional Outlook

Nutritional Outlook, June 2018

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NUTRITIONAL OUTLOOK ■ JUNE 2018 oxide–stimulating herbs such as notogin- seng. (Quirk points to a 2016 study pub- lished in Experimental and T erapeutic Medicine that suggests that enhancing a person's nitric oxide levels with beet juice can "signif cantly increase exercise endur- ance and oxygenation for an overall in- creased energy ef ect," he says.) Draco is also involved with a cof ee-based product that includes MCTs "plus a metabo- lism-stimulating, insulin-sensitizing omega-7 palmitoleic acid and omega-9 lipid-rich oil specially processed from egg yolk, called Yolk Oil," Quirk reports. He says that delving into omega-7 fats is a new direction for the com- pany and an area that is generally underap- preciated. Palmitoleic acid can increase fat metabolism and insulin sensitivity, he says, "which relate directly to energy production." Another newer energy product featuring botanicals is InnoBev's WakeUp, developed with the Technion-Israel Institute of Technol- ogy and the Weizmann Institute of Science (also in Israel). T e daily-dose shot includes extracts of guarana, ginkgo biloba, elderberry, and FruitUp (a low-glycemic-index fruit syr- up), and was developed in part as a response to the "growing [complaints] expressed against the high-caf eine, high-sugar energy drinks," according to Eli Faraggi, cofounder and CEO of InnoBev. T e company says the product "improves alertness and cognitive performance for at least 120 minutes with minimal caf eine, no heart-rate ef ects, and no tolerance ef ect over time," and Faraggi cites a small study published in the Israel Medical Association Journal in 2013 to support this claim. Sustained-Energy Carbs Carbohydrates have gotten a bad rap over the years, earning a reputation for contribut- ing to weight gain, diabetes, and crash-and- burn energy dips. Suppliers such as Beneo (Morris Plains, NJ) and Ingredion (West- chester, IL), however, have formulated car- bohydrate-based ingredients for nutrition brands looking for "clean," low-glycemic-in- dex carbs to incorporate into their function- al foods and beverages. Beneo's Palatinose (isomaltulose) is a non- GMO carbohydrate made from sugar beets, President Jon Peters says. He describes it as "fully digestible" and "slow release." T is low-glycemic-index (32) ingredient, at a concentration of 4 kcal/g, provides the same amount of energy as sucrose; "however," Pe- ters adds, "because of its stable molecular makeup, this functional carbohydrate is di- gested more slowly and delivered in a sus- tained way to the body's cells." Ingredion's Sustra 2434, another slow- ly digested carbohydrate, was just recently launched in September of 2017. Contain- ing corn starch and tapioca f our and best suited for cold-pressed-bar and smoothie applications, this ingredient is "clean-label, gluten-free, easy to formulate with, and certi- f ed in conformity with Ingredion's TrueTrace program for non-genetically modif ed ingre- dients," says Patrick Luchsinger, marketing manager, nutrition, for Ingredion Inc. "T is starch blend has been scientif cally shown to ef ect a lower glycemic index and steadier blood-sugar levels over an extended period, leading to balanced, long-lasting energy." He adds that there has been a lot of interest in and sampling of the ingredient by customers, who are now testing it out in formulations. Cleaner, More Natural, "Better For You" Beverages, snacks, and supplements formu- lated to increase and sustain energy in the consumer are clearly following the larger industry trend of "cleaner," more natural, better-for-you ingredients. As consumers of all ages—and particularly Millennials— become ever more adept at using Internet sources and social media to further their health education, inform themselves, and share what they've learned within minutes via large-scale online platforms, brand man- agers and suppliers should respond with products perceived as more natural, health- ful, and clean. Maureen Kingsley is a freelance writer, editor, and proofreader based in Los An- geles. She covers a variety of industries, in- cluding medical technology, food-ingredi- ent manufacturing, and cinematography. 53

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