Nutritional Outlook

Nutritional Outlook, April 2018

Issue link: http://dc.cn.ubm-us.com/i/962415

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 41 of 85

■ NUTRITIONAL OUTLOOK APRIL 2018 Vitamins can decrease pain experienced by long-term suf erers. Observational studies have found a high prevalence of vitamin D def ciency or insuf ciency in those suf ering from chronic pain 4 , and estimates by some investigators based on an analysis of 2005-2006 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examina- tion Survey (NHANES) suggest that nearly 42% of U.S. adults are vitamin D def cient. 5 According to NHANES, vitamin D def cien- cy is also substantially higher in Hispanics (69%) and blacks (82%). 5 Maria Helde-Frankling and Linda Björkhem-Bergman of the Karolinska In- stitute and Karolinska University Hospital (Stockholm, Sweden) recently authored a re- view discussing the role of vitamin D in pain management. 4 In this review, they highlight the anti-inf ammatory ef ects of vitamin D in the body that may lead to a decreased perception of pain when def ciency states are corrected. Vitamin D's physiological mechanisms include reducing the release of pro-inf ammatory cytokines and shifting T- cell responses to favor those that are anti-in- f ammatory rather than pro-inf ammatory in nature. Vitamin D has been shown to inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandin E2, an impor- tant factor in inf ammatory pain. Further studies have found that vitamin D admin- istration resulted in the downregulation of TNF- and leukotriene B4, also pain-related cytokines. Vitamin D and Pain: Clinical Effects In recent years, several clinical studies have been performed to assess the potential benef ts of vitamin D supplementation for chronic pain associated with various causes. While not all studies have had positive re- sults, several have shown a benef cial impact of vitamin D. A recent study by Babita Ghai and col- leagues from the Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (Chandi- garh, India) looked at vitamin D supplemen- tation in individuals with chronic lower back pain. 6 In the open-label study, 68 adults with chronic low back pain greater than 3 months in duration and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels less than 30 ng/ml (a level commonly considered vitamin D insuf cient) were sup- plemented with 60,000 IU of vitamin D3 week- ly for eight weeks and followed for 6 months. T e mean vitamin D level at baseline was 12.8 ng/ml in the patient population, but supplementation increased vitamin D levels Several clinical studies have been performed to assess the potential benef ts of vitamin D supplementation for chronic pain associated with various causes.

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Nutritional Outlook - Nutritional Outlook, April 2018