MPMN_Medical Product Manufacturing News

Medical Product Manufacturing News, November/December 2015

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M E D I C A L P R O D U C T M A N U F A C T U R I N G N E W S Q M E D . C O M / M P M N 1 4 N O V E M B E R / D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 5 TOP PRODUCTS &SERVICES: 2015 Boosting the Performance of Braided Catheters with a Patent-Pending Metal Coating ProPlate's Torq-Lok is a unique technology applied to braided catheters for enhanced performance. Preliminary testing of Torq-Lok compared to noncoated braids demonstrated a range of 30–66% greater torque response, a 66% increase in torque to failure, and a 90° twist increase, according to ProPlate (Anoka, MN). Torq-Lok also maintains flexibility, increases kink resistance, improves pushability, and constrains radial forces while minimizing elongation. The need for annealing the braid ends after manufacturing is eliminated because the process fuses them together preventing fraying. (Braids used in test: 4 French OD, 60 pic count, 12 inches long, 2-over-2-under-2 pattern, 0.001 x 0.004-in. wire. Results may vary.) The benefits of the technology come thanks to a novel patent-pending metal coating that is atomically bonded to a catheter braid, fusing the cross sections together as one.. With the application of Torq-Lok, the braid pic count can be reduced. Torq-Lok achieves the same or higher torque response, torque to failure, and twist range. Torq-Lok also maintains the braid wire profile and flexibility. Cost savings for the braid manufacturer can be achieved by reducing material costs and production time. Torq-Lok will also eliminate unraveling at catheter ends, thus reducing additional product and productivity losses. For surgeons, greater device control can result in more accurate placement of self expanding stents or heart valves and potentially less time to complete the procedure, therefore reducing risk to the patient and decreasing costs for the surgeon. A Solution to the Superbug Scare? UCLA's Ronald Reagan Medical Center has installed Langford IC Systems' "LIC" machine to clean endoscopes in the aftermath of a deadly superbug outbreak, according to a recent announcement from Proven Process Medical Devices, which helped Langford engineer and test the device. The LIC uses no connectors, and does not push water and disinfectants through the endoscopes in a garden hose-like, one-way flow like other endoscope cleaning devices, according to Proven Process (Mansfield, MA). Instead, the LIC's patented technology creates a fluid dynamic that pushes and pulls fluid at fierce velocity. Water and disinfectants reverse directions thousands of times through the scope and its channels, creating a powerful scrubbing action on all of the endoscope's surfaces, corners and crevices. Creating Durable Force Sensors FlexiForce force sensors from Tekscan (Boston) can measure force between almost any two surfaces and are durable enough to stand up to most environments. The sensors are available off-the-shelf for prototyping or can be customized to meet the specific needs of your product design and application requirements. As a result of their form factor, which is thin, flexible, and lightweight, FlexiForce sensors are ideal for OEM product integration in applications where force feedback is required. These characteristics, as well as their low power requirements, make them ideal for product designs where size and portability are important. The sensors can be used for an array of medical applications ranging from robotic surgery and drug delivery systems to orthopedics and physical therapy devices. The sensors are available off-the-shelf for prototyping or can be customized to meet the specific needs of your product design and application requirements.

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