EMDT_European Medical Device Technology

European Medical Device Technology, Spring 2015

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emdt.co.uk European Medical Device Technology Spring 2015 | 27 MEDICAL EXPERTISE ASSEMBLED ON MIKRON SOLUTIONS - 40 years of experience with assembly systems - Assembly platforms designed for cleanroom - Highly configurable, FDA validated standard software - Electronic signature CFR 21 part 11 - Team of validation experts supporting projects WWW.MIKRON.COM OUR AUTOMATION SOLUTIONS, BASED ON 40 YEARS OF UNEQUALED EXPERIENCE, OFFER THE BEST PRODUCTIVITY DURING THE FULL LIFE CYCLE OF YOUR PRODUCTS. THE AUTOMATION SOLUTION STANDARD AUTOMATION PLATFORMS Production solutions for assembled products you can hold in your hand EUROPE : BOUDRY (SWITZERLAND), BERLIN (GERMANY) NORTH AMERICA : DENVER (USA) - ASIA : SINGAPORE , SHANGHAI (CHINA) Mikron G05 Linear Assembly Platform Mikron Tray Handler See us at MEDTEC Europe Stand #5B26 in turn, benefitted the medtech sector, as many of the cutting-edge start-ups are at the nexus of IT and healthcare, such as OrCam, which develops smart glasses capable of identifying objects for visually impaired patients. Fast In, Fast Out The Israeli start-up success story has a few shortcomings, however. While the country seems to be an excellent breeding ground for innovative ideas and young companies, the start-ups hardly ever grow to be big internationals. "Out of the total 465 medical device companies in the country, the majority, 295 or 63.4% of the total, are small, with just between 1 to 10 employees," according to Glen Peters of BMI. "Only 54 of these companies employ over 50 employees or more." According to Dow Jones Venture- Source, Israeli startups get acquired within 3.95 years on average, far earlier than firms in other countries. One exam- ple is the manufacturer of a swallowable capsule endoscopes Given Imaging that was bought by Covidien by the end of 2013 for $860m. While this speaks for the attractiveness of the companies, there are significant downsides for the country. "Many Israeli start-ups are sold to the U.S. market and get absorbed into global firms, never really expanding in Israel," noted Mario Cervantes, OECD senior economist. "This is expected given the small size of the internal market, but it does raise questions about how much of the returns from innovation end up back in the economy in terms of jobs created." Israeli companies that decide to go public usually do so on the United States or the UK. "The forte of Israel is early R&D and clinical validation. The local market is small and the international markets are far away," Lorberbaum added. "As it requires resources to actually build an international operation, many entrepre- neurs prefer to pass the start-up on or sell it out to larger busines, often stay with the multinationals for a limited period and then come back and start a second or a third company." This entrepreneurial spirit combined with an excellent technical education and the ubiquitous chutzpah make it likely that Israel's start-ups will stays at the forefront of medical innovation for quite a while. Israeli startups get acquired within 3.95 years on average, far earlier than companies in other countries.

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