EMDT_European Medical Device Technology

European Medical Device Technology, Spring 2015

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emdt.co.uk European Medical Device Technology Spring 2015 | 15 Nanotechnology Enables Biocompatible Antibacterial Plastics The Dutch-Italian start-up Parx Plastics could make quite a splash in the medical device industry. The company was named one of the top three tech startups in Europe by the European Commission for its antibacterial plastic technology. Rotterdam-based Parx Plastics has devised a method for equip- ping plastics with antibacterial properties without the use of biocides, heavy metals or nanoparticles. "In our process, we apply our technology to existing materials. So, the plastic material used for implants are the bases we work with and we apply an intrinsic change on the nanoscale to this original material," said Michael van der Jagt, one of the founders of the company. "We are not using nanoscale materials, but we are merely applying the nano- technology. We are using a bodily own noncytotoxic trace element, and we have found a method to incorporate it in the existing mate- rial in such a way that it does not migrate or leach out." Existing technologies that render plastic antibacterial often experience migrating or leaching, according to the company. "Often, the presently available solutions are making use of toxic substances, but the doses are low, and at these levels they are not hazardous to the patient. The benefits outweigh the risks," van der Jagt explained. "But the fact that there is migration means that property lasts only a limited time." Parx claims its method is fully biocompatible, meaning that the antibacterial property lasts the lifetime of the product. "We have set 98 to 99% antibacterial property as our targets, and we have seen materials perform as high as 99,9% Log 3 reduc- tion. Our attention goes to stabilizing these types of results with our technology," van der Jagt added. "We are not ready yet to offer a Log 4 reduction. Perhaps this is something we manage to develop in the future." Van der Jagt also noted that the company is currently work- ing on a number of applications for medical devices, but couldn't disclose any details. One possible area where the technology could provide a major benefit, however, is in surgical meshes. "Looking at hernia mesh, for example, the biggest threat to the patient is an infected mesh. It will take 8 to 12 months and multiple surgeries to recover from it. If we can reduce the chance that this occurs, the cost advantage is huge," he said. "But also benefits can be identi- fied when applying the technology to, for example, hospital inte- riors, medical device casings, wound dressing, surgery aprons, IV lines, and dialyses machines." —T.K. THE ORIGINAL MEDICAL PUSH-PULL CONNECTOR Redel 1P Series Self-latching plastic connectors Sterilizable Solder, crimp and print contacts Fluidic connectors From 2 to 14 contacts Redel 2P Series Self-latching plastic connectors Sterilizable Solder, crimp and print contacts From 16 to 32 contacts Redel 3P Series Sterilizable Fibre optic, coaxial or high voltage contacts Hybrid connectors From 6 to 18 contacts ® ® REDEL IS A LEMO GROUP COMPANY - Switzerland Phone : (+41 21) 695 16 00 info@lemo.com Contact your local partner on www.lemo.com

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