EMDT_European Medical Device Technology

European Medical Device Technology, Spring 2014

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emdt.co.uk European Medical Device Technology Spring 2014 | 33 placed fifth in the worldwide diabetes ranking in 2012 with 7.6-million patients. Plastic surgery has also seen an unprece- dented rise over the last decade. In terms of cosmetic procedures performed, Brazil now ranks second only to the United States. The overall rise in the number of surgeries by 20% is accompanied by an increasing demand for high-quality equipment and treatment, which the undersupplied sys- tem—2.3 hospital beds and 1.9 doctors per 1,000 patients, compared with Germany, where they amount to 8.1 and 3.5, respec- tively—simply cannot provide. Public and Private Investment Although the increase in public spending on healthcare in recent years has been higher than the country's GDP growth, the system remains underdeveloped. Opin- ion polls have identified healthcare as the protesters' number-one source of dissatis- faction, which has led to both federal and municipal governments allocating large sums of money in the budget for invest- ments in this field. An estimated 36-million Brazilians have ascended into the middle class within the past four years. The resulting growth in purchasing power has prompted an unprecedented number of people—almost 50 million in 2013—to seek private health insurance, which has, in turn, generated significant private investment. Esho-Group and Rede D'or, two of the largest private hospital operators in Brazil, announced in 2012 that they would invest more than US$500 million to build and renovate several of the country's existing clinics. The government has also recently started to join forces with private clinics: Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Minos Gerais are only a few examples of federal states that have increasingly invested in PPP. Within these projects, it usually falls to the private providers to finance the acquisition and maintenance of the costly medical equip- ment, but public investment in this field is also growing. Opportunities and Challenges for European Medical Device Companies A large share of Brazil's medical technology is currently imported from abroad, and the country is expected to depend on foreign manufacturers for the foreseeable future. Opportunities for international produc- ers of innovative high-tech segments—like radiotherapy, imaging and diagnostics—to win public tenders remain especially high. Apart from the many small and medium- sized companies that export their products to Brazil, there are some major foreign players in the leading Latin American market. In 2013, Toshiba Medical joined Philips, GE Healthcare, B. Braun and Siemens in producing high-tech medical equipment in Brazil. Most of these firms are investing heavily in their Brazilian Smaller The number of companies you can trust. Smallest The number of companies that deliver consistent performance. Small The number of companies that provide Gore-style quality. Our biggest contribution to reinforced medical tubing… is actually very small. Products listed may not be available in all markets. GORE, PERFORMANCE THROUGH INNOVATION, and designs are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates. ©2013 W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. AS2088-EN1 DECEMBER 2013 :/*RUH $VVRFLDWHV,QFü)ODJVWDō$= gore.com/medicaloem An estimated 36-million Brazilians have ascended into the middle class within the past four years. Visit us at MEDTEC Europe Stand 5C44 ES433901_EMDT1405_033.pgs 05.02.2014 14:04 UBM black yellow magenta cyan

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