PD_Packaging Digest

Packaging Digest, April 2013

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www.PackagingDigest.com APRIL 2013 // TRENDS 17 At Hammer Packaging, "If you're a talented engineer, and you speak English and Chinese or even another language, like German or French, you become more valuable to us." — Sean Murphy, chief creative officer at Hong Kong-based YFYJupiter Marketing speaks a language that manufacturing doesn't understand and vice versa." In fact, packaging professionals are in a position to learn myriad business languages, including those of design, marketing and finance, because they interact with so many different functions within their companies. Being fluent in languages used in different regions is becoming more useful, as well. "For our Asian-based engineers and designers, basic English skills are needed to help communicate with our international customers. And for our foreign engineers and designers working in Asia, I would suggest learning some Chinese," says Sean Murphy, chief creative officer at Hong Kong-based YFYJupiter. He adds, "If you're a talented engineer, and you speak English and Chinese or even another language, like German or French, you become more valuable to us because so many of our clients in Asia come from all around the world. Tese language skills will really bump up your resume with us." Selling it Adaptability is another skill that's becoming more necessary. Like businesspeople in other professions, packaging professionals "need to adjust and be more adaptable to this rapidly changing global marketplace," says Pete Macauley, director, global packaging and sustainability, Abbott Laboratories. Macauley further notes the value of skills like collaboration, persuasion and negotiation, all of which have a strong communications component. Packaging professionals have always collaborated with others in their own companies, but now they are collaborating much more with other organizations. "I sit in more meetings today with my peer competitors than I probably did in my first 15 or 20 years in the industry. You have to have that collaborative approach," Macauley says. Also essential is "the ability to sell your ideas," he adds. "As packaging teams, we always said we want a seat at the table—we need to be more recognized. Well, you look around industry today, and there are more vp-level packaging people than ever before, so we [have] that recognition. Now we've got to be able to sell it. Now we've got to deliver on the concepts." In addition, negotiation skills are good to have. As with selling, negotiation requires careful communication and the ability to craft win-win solutions. Getting schooled So where's a packaging professional to go to develop these skills? Tose on the executive track may decide to earn an MBA degree. Others may go the adult-education route, taking classes in person or online. Many colleges and universities offer relevant undergraduate and graduate-level classes through their continuing-ed programs. Stanford University's Continuing Studies course catalog includes topics like "Persuasive Face-to-Face Business Communication," "Coaching Skills for Leaders and Managers" and "Negotiation Mastery: Achieving Outstanding Results and Relationships." Consultants and industry groups also provide professional-development training. Packaging Technology Integrated Solutions, for example, offers a workshop called "Championing and Selling Packaging." And companies like Abbott offer in-house training, including cultural-sensitivity classes to prepare packaging professionals for projects in we've been setting industry standards since we opened our doors in 1912. To us, it's not just about printing a stack of labels, it's about using superior technologies, proven processes, and a team of production masterminds to far exceed customer expectations. We are more than label printers... We are Package Decorators! "I sit in more meetings today with my peer competitors than I probably did in my first 15 or 20 years in the industry. You have to have that collaborative approach." — Pete Macauley, director, global packaging and sustainability, Abbott Laboratories distant lands or with far-flung team members. Finally, for social media, how-to videos are readily available online (just Google "social media tutorials"). But they may not be necessary. "Te beauty of something like Twitter is it's actually very simple. Most people who get on there and start playing with it will grasp it," says Eben Bayer, CEO of Ecovative. "You don't need to be an expert. You just need to show up." Ecovative, 518-273-3753 www.mushroompackaging.com Packaging Technology Integrated Solutions, 800-875-0912, www.ptisglobal.com TricorBraun, 800-325-7782 www.tricorbraun.com YFYJupiter, 415-409-2540, www.yfyjupiter.com In 2007, Hammer Packaging introduced variable sleeve offset printing (VSOP) technology for shrink sleeves to North America. Today, we are the largest user of VSOP technology in the world. This advanced process produces top-quality packaging, and there is no cost for plates to make quick, easy graphic changes. VSOP is ideal for full-run productions and limited-time promotions. To learn more about VSOP, please contact sales@hammerpackaging.com or 585.424.3880 hammerpackaging.com magenta cyan yellow black ES220455_PD1304_017.pgs 03.26.2013 20:07 UBM

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